The University of Zambia – Department of Psychology proudly announces and invites application for the UPDATED short course in Participatory Monitoring and Evaluation for Programs, Projects and Policies (PM&E) and Data Analysis in the evenings from 6th November-15th December, 2017 (17:30 – 19:30 hrs.).

1.    Participatory Monitoring and evaluation (17th October- 30th November,  2016)
This course is designed for people working in M&E or are interested to work in M&E jobs

  • Introduction (history) – monitoring and evaluation
  • Theory of change and managing for impact
  • Linking project design, annual planning and PM&E
  • Elements of monitoring and evaluation
  • Selecting evaluation designs
  • Sampling, data collection methods and tools
  • Managing and communicating M&E information
  • Evaluation ethics, polices and principles
  • Learning and documenting best practices
  • Conditions supporting effective PM&E systems
  • Developing PM&E Terms of References
  • Basic data analysis: qualitative and quantitative
  • Practical: Developing the PM&E system, project monitoring experience, and oral presentation


2.    In-house tailored trainings in Monitoring and &Evaluation and Data Analysis.

  • We offer tailored trainings to organizations  in M&E and Data Analysis with a minimum of 10 participants

Requirements

  • A minimum of a diploma in any relevant field. Monitoring and evaluation experience or immediate application of such knowledge is added advantage.

Application form can be downloaded by clicking on this link DOWNLOAD APPLICATION FORM

Application deadline: 15th October, 2017      Fees: ZMK 3500.00

For details contact:
University of Zambia, Department of Psychology
+260975 054639 OR 0955 630871 (during working days & hours only)
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

SHORT COURSE ON OFFER

Title: Forensic and Criminal Investigations Psychology
Duration: 8 weeks
Dates: 4th September, 2017 - 31st October, 2017
Venue: UNZA PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT
Lecture Hours:  17:30hrs - 19:30hrs Monday to Friday
Fee: K3,550.00


REQUIREMENTS

This course is intended for those with an interest in psychology and/or criminal investigation, and does not require any previous experience of studying either subject

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course is aimed at anyone interested in gaining a deeper understanding of human behaviour in general and the psychology of criminal behavior in particular, and it's impact throughout the legal system. Explore how the human mind works, its limitations, and discover how psychology can obtain evidence from eyewitnesses in police investigations and prevent miscarriage of justice.

REGISTRATION AND CONTACT

Download Registration Form

For more details, contact:

  • P.H. NAMANGALA (0977660129) 
  • K.C. NAKAZWE CHANDA (0973896731)

A course fee of K3,550.00 or minimal down payment of K2,000.00 must be deposited in the following Barclays Bank account:

Account Name UNZA Department of Psychology
Account Number 1067722
Branch UNZA
Swift Code BARCZMLX
Sort Code 020026

 

NOTE: Bank Deposit slips should be taken to the financial officer, School of Humanities (HSS), located on 3rd Floor, Room 217 or 2nd floor Room 113 HSS, next to the Dean’s Office, for receipting together with a filled-in registration form

The University of Zambia-Department of Population Studies, Monitoring and Evaluation Centre of Excellence in collaboration with International and Local Cooperating Partners proudly announces and invites applications for the following short-courses for 2017 to be conducted in the evening  (16:30-19:30)

COURSE DATE TIME
Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) 20th  to 31st March, 2017 16:30 -19:30
Survey Data Analysis Using Stata Software 17th to 29th  April, 2017 16:30-19:30
Qualitative Data Analysis using Atlas.ti 29th May to 9th  June 2017 16:30-19:30
Mapping and Presentation of Data using QGIS Software 17th to 21st July 2017 16:30-19:30
Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) 28th August to 8th September 2017 16:30-19:30

 

The short courses will cover fundamental concepts and tools for monitoring and evaluation, survey data analysis, qualitative data analysis, mapping and presentation of data. The target audience includes National level M&E Professionals and their counterparts, Programme officers, Researchers, Planners, Consultants, Statisticians, Data Analysts, Academia, Students and Programme Advisors etc. The short courses are also designed for Officers in Government, Non-Governmental Organisations, Private Sector and all National and sub-National level institutions with interest in monitoring and evaluation, data analysis, visualization and presentation of data.

Download Application Form[pdf]

Requirements:

  • Understanding of basic statistics
  • Working in an environment related to Health, Education, Business, Planning, and Research, Statistics, Monitoring and Evaluation or any other Social and Applied Sciences.
  • University/College graduate

For details relating to application forms and tuition fees, please contact:

University of Zambia
Department of Population Studies

Cell lines: +260-974-532-558 / +260-974-104-260 / +260-961-032-092
Emails:

ONLY LIMITED PLACES ARE AVAILABLE

The University of Zambia – Department of Psychology proudly announces and invites application for the UPDATED short course in Participatory Monitoring and Evaluation for Programs, Projects and Policies (PM&E) and Data Analysis in the evenings from 17th October - 30th November, 2016 (17:30 – 19:30hrs).

1. Participatory Monitoring and evaluation (17th October- 30th November, 2016)

This course is designed for people working in M&E or are interested to work in M&E jobs

  • Introduction (history) – monitoring and evaluation
  • Theory of change and managing for impact
  • Linking project design, annual planning and PM&E
  • Deciding what to monitor and evaluate
  • Selecting evaluation designs
  • Sampling, data collection methods and tools
  • Managing and communicating M&E information
  • Evaluation ethics, polices and principles
  • Learning and documenting best practices
  • Conditions supporting effective PM&E systems
  • Developing PM&E Terms of References
  • Basic data analysis: qualitative and quantitative
  • Practical: Developing the PM&E system, project monitoring experience, and oral presentation

2. In-house tailored trainings in Monitoring and &Evaluation and Data Analysis

  • We offer tailored trainings to organizations with a minimum of 10 participants
  • Offer attractive fees and free consultation on developing M&E system/plan

Requirements

  • A minimum of a diploma in any relevant field. Monitoring and evaluation experience or immediate application of such knowledge is added advantage

Application form can be downloaded below or requested

Application Form [pdf]

Application deadline: 7th October, 2016
Fees: ZMK 3500.00

For details contact: University of Zambia, Department of Psychology
+260975 054639 OR 0955 630871 (during working days & hours only)

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

The University of Zambia, School of Medicine, Department of Public Health proudly announces and invites for a short-course in Management for Public Health (MfPH) to be conducted from 24th August to 4th September, 2015 from 08:00-17:00hrs.

The course will cover fundamental concepts and tools in Management for Public Health. The target audience includes Public Health Professionals and their counterparts, assistants and advisors who are involved in the Management of Public Health services. The MfPH short course is also designed for Officers in Government, Non-Governmental Organisations, Private sector and all National and sub-National level institutions with interest in public health.

TOPICS TO BE COVERED INCLUDE AMONG OTHERS:

  • Advocacy
  • Conflict management
  • Grant writing
  • Introduction to leadership
  • Performance management
  • Process improvement
  • Financial management (FAMS)

REQUIREMENTS

  • Working in an environment related to Health, HIV/AIDS, planning, research or any other social and applied sciences
  • Masters student in any health related field

FEES

  • K1,500 (students)
  • K2,000 (others)

For details relating to application forms and tuition fees, contact:

University of Zambia, Department of Public Health
Cell: +260 977 746805 or +260 977 453107
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

ONLY LIMITED PLACES ARE AVAILABLE

QUALITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS WITH NVIVO, AND WRITING

Rationale

Qualitative research methods are increasingly becoming useful in providing information for planning, implementing and evaluating health, education and development programs. Qualitative methods are also useful for research students studying complex socio-behavioral issues in health and social sciences. 

Course aim

The course provides participants advanced knowledge and skills in processing, analyzing, writing and disseminating qualitative research data, through the use a qualitative software NVivo. The course also orients participants on how different data sources including images, audios, videos, social media data and published information can be integrated and analyzed to give a comprehensive understanding of the study phenomena. 

Target Audience

This course can benefit individuals and organizations whose day-to day activities is research or who value qualitative information in planning, implementing, and evaluating their programs. These may include Lecturers, postgraduate students, government departments, Non-government organizations, international development and humanitarian organizations, and community-based organizations.   

Entry requirements

A minimum of diploma in a social sciences, education or health related field

Relevant training and experience in qualitative research

Basic research and computing skills (Microsoft Office)

Program structure and certification

This course will be administered in a period of two weeks in the Department of Public Health in the School of Medicine of the University of Zambia. Participants will be allowed an extra two weeks to complete their assignments, after which they will graduate. Only students who will pass will get a certificate. The course will be certified by the Department of Public Health of the University of Zambia

Course objectives

• By the end of the course, participants should be able to:

• To explain the qualitative data analysis process including the interconnectivity between data collection, analysis and writing

• To distinguish the different data analysis approaches and techniques

• To create and manage qualitative research project in NVivo and other supporting software 

• To apply the qualitative data analysis processes and techniques in NVivo while recognizing the iterative nature of qualitative research process

• To write different pieces of qualitative data analysis outputs and understand how these outputs contribute to the write-up and dissemination of results from a qualitative inquiry

COURSE DETAILS

An overview of qualitative research methods

Qualitative data processing and analysis approaches (Content, Thematic, Narrative, Conversation, Grounded theory and Discourse analysis)

Qualitative computing and NVIVO

Creating a database in NVIVO

Working with multiple data sources (documents, images, audio, video and web-based data)

Creating nodes and case nodes

Coding, and working with coded data 

Handling ideas: journals, memos, coding stripes and relationship nodes

Managing data: Cases, Classifications and Collections 

Modelling, charting, graphing and matrices

Using coding and queries to further analysis

Reporting and managing outputs from NVivo

Using NVivo in conjunction with Endnote to combine data analysis and literature review 

Working with NVivo for  Team projects

A note on discourse analysis in qualitative research

Basic principles in writing and disseminating qualitative research

Writing qualitative research outcomes for publication 

Teaching and learning methods

Hands-on, Lectures, group work, and case studies

Assessments

Groups work 20 %

NVIVO project 30%

Written analysis 50%

Readings

Bazeley, P., & Jackson, K. (Eds.). (2013). Qualitative data analysis with NVivo. Sage Publications Limited.

Grbich, C. (2012). Qualitative data analysis: An introduction. Sage.

QRS International (2010) NVIVO 10 Getting started (online)

Richards, Lynn (2008) Teach yourself NVIVO 8 (online)

Silverman, D. (2013). Doing qualitative research: A practical handbook. SAGE Publications Limited.

Swales, J. M., & Feak, C. B. (2004). Academic writing for graduate students: Essential tasks and skills (Vol. 1). Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press.

PLANNING AND EVALUATING HEALTH PROMOTION PROGRAM

Rationale

The course provides students with a theoretical and philosophical basis for planning and evaluating health promotion programs. This course is important for students of health promotion because it shows how planning and evaluation of health promotion programs is based on unique theoretical and ethical basis from other planning and evaluation programs in health.

Course aim

This course module is aimed at providing students with practical experience in planning, implementing, and evaluation of health promotion programmes for specific settings and groups

Learning objectives

At the end of this module, students should be able to:

• Describe the basic elements of program planning in health promotion

• Develop appropriate action and strategies plans for health promotion for groups, communities, and populations.

• Identify barriers to successful implementation of plans for health promotion programs.

• Identify methods for overcoming barriers to program implementation.

• Demonstrate advanced skills in project management and process improvement as applied to health promotion.

• Demonstrate the ability to develop, implement, and constructively evaluate public health programs and evaluation plans. 

Course content

Basic concepts in planning and evaluation

Settings for health promotion practice

‘Community’ and health needs assessment

Stakeholders analysis and community participation

Problem analysis and the logic model

Program design and implementation plans

Process improvement and quality control

Gender mainstreaming in planning and evaluation

Conflict management in planning and evaluation

Evaluation frameworks and methods in health promotion

Participatory evaluation methods in health promotion

Case studies in planning and evaluating health promotion programs in different settings 

Ethical issues health promotion practice

Teaching and learning methods

Lectures, Case studies, Discussions (group work, presentations) 

Assessment methods 

Group work and participation 

Case analysis

Group project presentation 

Prescribed readings

Brassard, M. (1988).The Memory Jogger: A Pocket Guide of Tools for Continuous Improvement Goal/QPC; 2nd edition 

Green, L. W., & Kreuter, M. W. (2005). Health program planning: An educational and ecological approach. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Nutbeam, D. (1998). "Evaluating health promotion: progress, problems and solutions." Health Promotion International Vol. 13(1): 27-44.

Rootman, I. (ed) (2001): Evaluation in Health Promotion. Principles and Perspectives. WHO Regional Publication, European Series, No.92 .

Ministry of Health, World Health Organization (1997) Evaluating Implementation  Strategies for Health for all by the Year 2000

MANAGEMENT FOR PUBLIC HEALTH

Rationale

The need to build capacity and sustain management skills among public health workers at all levels for efficient and effective management and delivery of public health services, has been recognized over the years. Highly skilled and highly ethical managers are needed in Government and Non-Governmental sectors to efficiently and effectively utilize the resources to provide equitable access to quality health care.  

Course aim

The goal of this course is to increase the ability of public health managers to achieve health outcomes.  The course aims to instil the values of leadership and high ethical principles in all activities of public health practice.

Course objectives

• Develop, articulate, and implement a vision that leads the organization toward accomplishing its mission

• Build relationships within and outside the organization 

• Estimate, justify, and manage appropriate funding and staffing needs to accomplish the organization’s mission

• Develop a project management plan

• Use a variety of approaches to manage and resolve concerns, disagreements, and conflicts

• Focus on desired results by achieving set goals

• Identify, analyse, and improve existing processes within an organization

• Integrate data in the workplace to improve decision-making, organizational processes and effectiveness.

• Communicate clearly adapting communication styles and methods that are appropriate for the intended audiences.

• Establish systems for monitoring and evaluating programs and services to ensure quality standards are being met

Target Audiences

This program is designed for district medical officers, medical supretendants, hospital administrators, planning officers, and administrative officers.  It can also benefit program and facility officers in the field of Nursing, Physiotherapy, Laboratory, pharmacy, environmental health, and managers of public health programs or health facilities outside the public sector (NGOs, Private sector)

Entry requirements

A minimum of diploma in health related field

Relevant training and experience in public health related field

Basic computing skills –Microsoft Office

A minimum of diploma in health related field or social sciences

Relevant training and experience in public health related field

Basic computing skills –Microsoft Office

Programs structure and management

The management for public health course is administered and delivered by the Department of Public Health, University of Zambia. The funding and support is provided by the US Centres for Disease Control and Prevention. The course will be certified by the Department of Public Health. The course is divided into two parts. The first part will be two weeks of class work, after which participants will get in the field for applied learning project for 7 weeks. The participants will be required to come back to their work place in the last one week to finalize and present their project.

Duration of the course

3 months (12 weeks)

Modules covered

Team Building

Introduction to leadership and management

Program planning and management

Financial management

Performance management

Communication and presentation skills

Management of data and information

Process improvement

Monitoring and evaluation

Coaching and mentoring

Conflict management

Teaching and learning methods

Lectures, case studies, role-plays, panel discussions, site visits, group work and presentations, audiovisual materials

Assessment methods

Continuous assessment (40%): Class attendance and participation (5%), group work and presentation (15%), project work plan (20%)

Final assessment (60%): Written report (50%) and presentation (10%) 

Fieldwork project

The fieldwork project is intended to provide an opportunity for participants to provide needed services to their work unit while practicing management skills presented in class. It is expected that participants will identify a management or service challenge that they would like to address through the training. For example, participants may focus on reducing the waiting times of outpatient department (OPD) or focus on reducing the cost (financial and material) if a particular service. Participants will consult with their supervisors to agree upon the project. While in class, participants will develop problem statement and project objectives to further focus their work. Projects should be of scope that is realistic to complete in nine weeks, including time for any necessary data collection and analysis. Participants will be assigned a mentor to provide guidance during the implementation of the project. Guidelines for mentors have been developed separately. Participants will return to the University approximately 2 months after the initial course to present the results of their work and deliver their final report.

Required readings

Capper S., Ginter, P. Leadership & Management: Cases and Context. Thousand Oaks, Sage. 2002.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Office of Workforce and Career Development Principles of Epidemiology in Public Health Practice (3rd ed.). Atlanta.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2002). Strategic Monitoring and Evaluation: A Draft Planning Guide and Related Tools for CDC GAP Country Programs. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta. (no URL available).

Center for Right Relationship Training: Global resources for those working with teams.  http://www.centerforrightrelationship.com/

Family Health International (2002). Evaluating Programs for HIV/AIDS Prevention and Care in Developing Countries: A Handbook for Program Managers and Decision Makers. Family Health International, Arlington. http://www.fhi.org/en/hivaids/pub/archive/evalchap/index.htm

Flaherty, James.  Coaching: Evoking Excellence In Others.  Butterworth- Heineman: 1999.

Greer, Michael, The Project Manager's Partner: A Step-by-Step Guide to Project Management. Amherst, MA: HRD Press, 1996

Heerkens, Gary R., Project Management. New York McGraw Hill, 2002

Monekosso G.L. 1994. District Health Management: planning, implementation and monitoring a minimum health for all package from mediocrity to excellence in health care. WHO Regional Office for Africa

Murray C.J.L. & Frenk, J (2000). “A framework for assessing the performance of health systems.” Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 78 (6)

Sturrock, W. (2001) English Communication Skills: Technical Writing and Presentations IHE028/01/1

Sustainable Management Development Program (2000). Healthy Plan it™ - a tool for planning and managing public health programs. Atlanta: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Tips for Transforming Conflict. www.sfcg.org/resources/resources_tips.html

Victor DA, “Conflict Management and Negotiation”, www.referenceforbusiness.com/management/Comp-De/Conflict-Management-and-Negotiation.html

World Health Organization Management for Health Services Delivery http://www.who.int/management/en/

WHO. Financial Management: An Overview and Field Guide for District Management Teams. http://www.who.int/management/Finances2Regulations.pdf

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT

Rationale

This course introduces participants to the study and evaluation of the impacts of policies, plans, programmes and projects on the quality of the environment and health. It particularly highlights the assessment of ecological and socio-economic impacts of development and how to mitigate them. 

Objectives

On successful completion of this course, participants should be able to: 

• Understand  the theory and practice of Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA); 

• Explain the significance of Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) in sustainable socio-economic development; 

• Interpret legislation related to EIA in Zambia; 

• Understand the linkages between policies, plans and programmes and environmental health through Health Impact Assessment;  

• Develop Environmental Impact Statements, Environmental Management Plans and other reports at various levels. 

Content

Part 1 Introduction to Environmental Impact Assessment

Definitions of terms

Evolution/historical background of the EIA process

Objectives of EIA

Basic principles of EIA

Benefits of EIA

Institutional and regulatory framework for EIA in Zambia

Environmental Management Act No 12 of 2011. Mines and Minerals Act etc. 

Major players in the EIA Process

Part 2 Stages in the EIA Process 

Screening- determination of which category of an EIA a project should  fall;

Scoping and preparation of terms of reference- Issues to be considered when preparing ToRs

Examination of alternatives

Impact Analysis-identification, characterization and assessment

Mitigation and impact management

Evaluation of significance

Preparation of an EIS or report

Review of the report

Decision making process 

Follow up- monitoring and audits

Environmental Management Plan

Part Three

Other Impact Assessments 

Social Impact Assessments

Health Impact Assessments

Strategic Environmental Assessments

Part Four 

Public/Stakeholder involvement in the EIA Process

Objectives of involvement at various stages of the EIA Process

Benefits of public/stakeholder involvement

Designing and implementing a public/stakeholder consultation plan

Tools and techniques for public/stakeholder involvement

Monitoring and Evaluation

Constraints to public/stakeholder involvement in the EIA Process

Assessment

Course attendance 10%  

Group assignment 30%

Final written Examinations 60%

SCHOOL-BASED HEALTH PROMOTION INTERVENTIONS

Rationale

Schools represent an opportunity for promoting health because it makes it possible to reach many children. Adolescence and the age of children provide an opportune time to put interventions that would safeguard the health of future generations. With the outbreak of Typhoid fever in schools in Kanyama compound in 2015, which left over 30 schools closed in the area, schools present an opportunity to prevent communicable diseases such as Typhoid. They have also been used to provide health services such as vaccinations. This course intends to provide participants practical health promotion issues in schools in developing countries. 

Course aim

The course aims at  providing  participants with skills and knowledge on the rationale for schools as a health promotion setting and the health promotion issues schools as a setting presents. It is also aimed at providing participants with skills on planning for health promotion interventions in schools including the ability for participants to conduct a school health needs assessment and stakeholder analysis. 

Target Audience

This course can benefit individuals and organizations who are working to improve and promote health in schools as well as those who use schools for their outreach health services. These include health workers, teachers (such as guidance and counselling teachers), government departments, Non-government organizations, international development and humanitarian organizations, private organizations, and community-based organizations.   

Entry requirements

A minimum of diploma in a social sciences, education or health related field

Relevant training and experience in school-based health promotion or health services

Basic computing skills –Microsoft Office

Program structure and certification

This course will be administered in a period of two weeks in the Department of Public Health in the School of Medicine of the University of Zambia. Participants will be allowed an extra two weeks to complete their assignments, after which they will graduate. Only students who will pass will get a certificate. The course will be certified by the Department of Public Health of University of Zambia.

Course objectives

By the end of this course participants should be able to:

• Demonstrate understanding of the link between education and health and how the schools presents an opportunities to offer health services and tackle the social determinants of health

• Understand how the psychological situation of children and adolescents in schools present both opportunities and challenges to improve the health and these relate to child rights and child protect

• Identify and discuss the most pressing health challenges among children and adolescents in schools

• Develop health promotion plans for tacking health and its determinants in schools and surrounding communities 

Course content

The link between education and health

The concept of health promotion schools

Planning for  healthy promotion schools

Conducting a school health needs and asset assessment

Stakeholders, the role of the PTA, and school skills clubs

Child and adolescent psychology and health behaviour

Children’s rights and child protection policies

Gender and health issues in schools

The healthy school curriculum and learning environment

Nutrition, food hygiene and safety

Smoking, drugs, and alcohol abuse

Bullying behaviour, and child abuse

Sexual behaviour, teenage pregnancy, child marriages and sexual health education

School water, sanitation, and waste management programs

Surveillance, prevention and management of disease outbreaks

Physical education, sports, and health 

First aid and management of injuries and accidents

School health services and immunization programs

Guidance and counselling services in schools

Teachers and role-modelling

Evaluating school-based health promotion programs

Teaching and learning methods

Lectures, case studies, and group work

Assessments

Case analysis (20%), Group work and presentation (30%), Class attendance (20%), Individual assignment (30%)

Required readings

Blake, D et al, (1999). Settings for Health Promotion: Linking Theory to Practice. Sage Publications Ltd.

Botvin, G. J., Schinke, S., & Orlandi, M. A. (1995). School-based health promotion: Substance abuse and sexual behavior. Applied and Preventive Psychology, 4(3), 167-184.

Deschesnes, M., Martin, C., & Hill, A. J. (2003). Comprehensive approaches to school health promotion: how to achieve broader implementation?. Health promotion international, 18(4), 387-396.

Henderson, A., S. Champlin, et al. (1998). Promoting Teen Health.Linking Schools, Health Organizations, and Community. Thousands Oaks, Sage Publications.

Vreeman, R. C., & Carroll, A. E. (2007). A systematic review of school-based interventions to prevent bullying. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, 161(1), 78-88.

COMMUNITY-BASED PARTICIPATORY RESEARCH FOR HEALTH

Rationale 

To empower participants with skills for understanding and critically evaluating the use of community-based participatory research in improving the health of communities

Course aim

To enable participants understand and critically evaluate the use of community-based participatory research to improve community health by tackling the social determinants of health

Target Audience

This course can benefit individuals and organizations who are working to improve and promote health and well-being of communities, neighborhoods and marginalized groups. These are workers from government departments, Non-government organizations, private organizations, and community-based organizations   

Entry requirements

A minimum of diploma in a social sciences, education or health related field

Relevant training and experience in health, community or social development field

Basic computing skills –Microsoft Office

Program structure and certification

This course will be administered in period of two weeks in the Department of Public Health in the School of Medicine of the University of Zambia. Participants will be allowed an extra two weeks to complete their assignments, after which they will graduate. Only students who will pass will be given a certificate. The course will be certified by the Department of Public Health of the University of Zambia.

Course Objectives

At the end of the course, students should be able to:

• Identify and explain the theoretical perspectives for community-based participatory research methods used to improve community health.

• Describe the major principles of community-based participatory research methods.

• Discuss the major community-based participatory research methodological considerations in planning for research, data gathering, and dissemination of results. 

• Identify the methods applicable to community-based participatory research and review their strengths and limitations in understanding and addressing public health problems.

• Debate the ethical issues when undertaking community-based participatory research and ways to deal with them.

Course content

Theoretical and historical foundations of Community-Based Research for Health 

Principles and application of CBPR

Key components and phases CBPR for health

Participants and participation CBPR for health

Methods and tools in CBPR (Photo Voice, Videos, Surveys, Mapping and community-based GIS, Drawing, Art Theatre, Diagramming, Ranking, Pile sorts, Free listing, Transect Walk, Roles plays, Meetings, Group discussions, Interviews) 

Case studies in CBPR for health

Action, change and sustainability in CBPR for health

Analysis, findings, and outcomes from CBPR for health

Class, power and gender in CBPR for health

Challenges and ethics in CBPR for health

Quality assurance and methodological rigor in CBPR

Teaching methods

Lectures

Case studies

Group work

Peer reviews

Assessment

Class participation 

Peers reviews 

Group work

Assignments

Required readings:

Berge, J. M., Mendenhall, T. J., & Doherty, W. J. (2009). Using Community‐Based Participatory Research (CBPR) to Target Health Disparities in Families. Family Relations, 58(4), 475-488.

Israel, B., Eng, E., Schulz, A., & Parker, E. (2005). Introduction to methods in CBPR for health. Methods in community-based participatory research for health, 3-26.

Kindon, S., Pain, R., & Kesby, M. (Eds.). (2007). Participatory action research approaches and methods: Connecting people, participation and place. Routledge.

Minkler, M., & Wallerstein, N. (Eds.). (2010). Community-based participatory research for health: From process to outcomes. John Wiley & Sons.

Jarg Bergold & Stefan Thomas (2012). Participatory Research Methods: A Methodological Approach in Motion, FQS, 13, 1.

Wang, C. C., Yi, W. K., Tao, Z. W., & Carovano, K. (1998). Photovoice as a participatory health promotion strategy. Health promotion international, 13(1), 75-86.

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FOR HEALTH

Rationale

Community development has been recognized to be a useful approach in social and economic development. This course explores the theory, strategies, and methods of community development and how they can be applied to improve and promote health and wellbeing of communities and neighbourhoods.

Course aim

The course aims to provide participants with knowledge and skills in using community development approaches and methods to the health and wellbeing of the communities.  The participants are also  expected to appreciate the value of local knowledge, social networks, infrastructure and institutions in community development for health.

Target Audience

This course can benefit individuals and organizations who are working to improve and promote health and well-being of communities, neighbourhoods and marginalized groups. These are workers f from government departments, Non-government organizations, private organizations, and community-based organizations   

Entry requirements

A minimum of diploma in a social sciences, education or health related field

Relevant training and experience in health, community or social development field

Basic computing skills –Microsoft Office

Program structure and certification

This course will be administered in a period of two weeks in the Department of Public Health in the School of Medicine of the University of Zambia. Participants will be allowed an extra two weeks to complete their assignments, after which they will graduate. Only students who will pass will be given a certificate. The course will be certified by the University of Zambia.

Course objectives

By the end of the course, participants will be expected to:

• Explain the key concepts, principles and strategies that underpin community development.

• Understand how community development approaches can be using to tackle the social determinants of health

• Apply community development approaches and methods to the health promotion and well-being of communities  by developing community development plans to promote health.

• Evaluate the impact of community development programs on the health of the community   

Course content

Theoretical foundations of community development

Determinants of health, public policy and community development

Community development strategies to improve health

Community and neighborhood health plans, control and change

Community health needs and assets assessment

Participatory action research and rural appraisals

Community-based GIS and lay health mapping

Developing community health indicators

Community organizing and building: models and approaches

Community participation and grassroots organizing for health programs

Community health workers and community-led health initiatives

Social capital, community networks and partnerships for health

Adult learning approaches and community literacy programs

Community advocacy and action for health

Using theatre and performative art  to advocate and promote health

Teaching methods

Lectures 

Group presentation

Discussion of case studies 

Assessments 

Case studies analysis - 20%

Group work and presentation - 20%

Community development project - 60%

Required Readings

Blake, D et al, (1999). Settings for Health Promotion: Linking Theory to Practice. Sage Publications Ltd.

Corbin, J. H., Mittelmark, M. B., & Lie, G. T. (2012). Scaling-up and rooting-down: a case study of North-South partnerships for health from Tanzania. Global health action, 5.

Heap, B., & Simpson, A. (2004). " When you have AIDS, people laugh at you": A Process Drama approach to Stigma with pupils in Zambia. Caribbean quarterly, 83-98.

Laverack, G., & Labonte, R. (2000). A planning framework for community empowerment goals within health promotion. Health policy and planning, 15(3), 255-262.

Wakefield, S. E., & Poland, B. (2005). Family, friend or foe? Critical reflections on the relevance and role of social capital in health promotion and community development. Social Science & Medicine, 60(12), 2819-2832.

PUBLIC ADVOCACY FOR HEALTH AND HUMAN RIGHTS

Rationale

Advocacy is a cornerstone of social change; hence contributing to social and human development. This course orients participants on advocacy strategies to improve health and human rights of marginalized communities and groups.

Course aim

The course aims to provide knowledge and skills in public advocacy for health and human rights. It also aims at understanding the complex relationship between health and human rights and how to generate evidence for public advocacy to improve health and human rights. 

Target Audience

This course can benefit individuals and organizations who are working to improve and promote health and human rights of marginalized communities and groups. These include workers from government departments, Non-government organizations, international development and humanitarian organizations, private organizations, and community-based organizations.   

Entry requirements

A minimum of diploma in a social sciences, education or health related field

Relevant training and experience in health and human rights promotion and advocacy

Basic computing skills –Microsoft Office

Program structure and certification

This course will be administered in a period of two weeks in the Department of Public Health in the School of Medicine of the University of Zambia. Participants will be allowed an extra two weeks to complete their assignments, after which they will graduate. Only students who will pass will get a certificate. The course will be certified by the University of Zambia.

Course objectives

By the end of this course, participants should be able to:

• Discuss the theory, strategies and tactics for public advocacy

• Debate the historical basis for public advocacy for health and human rights and how they apply for different political and cultural contexts

• Analyze the relationship between health and human rights and how these are related to the people’s health charter and international human rights frameworks

• Discuss the various human rights issues in different areas of health

• Design advocacy plans and use different media to implement an advocacy issue in view of the ethical issues that arise in public advocacy for health and human rights

Course content

The rationale for health and human rights advocacy

The link between health and human rights

The people health charter and international human rights frameworks

The concept of health as a human right in relation to other rights

Generative evidence and reporting health and human rights violations

Developing plans for advocacy for health and human rights

Advocacy theory, strategies and tactics

The role of civil society and social change movements

Building partnerships and alliances

Media advocacy for health and human rights

Theatre and performative art to advocate for health and human rights

Sexual and reproductive health rights

HIV/AIDS, infectious diseases and human rights

Disability, health and human rights

Health and human rights issues in prisons, schools, and work places

Health and human rights in humanitarian programs (refugees and displaced communities)

Teaching and learning methods

Lectures, group work, case studies

Assessments

Case study analysis, group work and presentations, written assignment

Readings

Assembly, U. G. (1948). Universal declaration of human rights. UN General Assembly.

Cook, R. J., Dickens, B. M., & Fathalla, M. F. (2003). Reproductive Health and Human Rights: Integrating Medicine, Ethics, and Law: Integrating Medicine, Ethics, and Law. Oxford University Press.

Corrêa, S., Petchesky, R., & Parker, R. (2008). Sexuality, health and human rights. Routledge.

Gruskin, S., Mills, E. J., & Tarantola, D. (2007). History, principles, and practice of health and human rights. The Lancet, 370(9585), 449-455.

Mann, J. M., Gostin, L., Gruskin, S., Brennan, T., Lazzarini, Z., & Fineberg, H. V. (1994). Health and human rights. Health and human rights, 6-23.

Panter-Brick, C. (2002). Street children, human rights, and public health: A critique and future directions. Annual review of anthropology, 147-171.

HEALTH COMMUNICATION AND EDUCATION

Rationale

The health communication and education course provides students the ability to develop and implement communication programs to not only change behaviour but also bring about improved understanding of health topics to enhance community health and development

Course aim

The course is aimed at providing participants with skills in communication and educational approaches to improve public health. The course examines theory, techniques and technologies that are used to communicate and enhance health literacy of individuals, communities and populations.

Target Audience

This course can benefit individuals and organizations whose work has elements of health communication and dissemination to selected communities, patients, policy makers and the general public. These may include health workers, journalists, teachers (such as guidance and counselling teachers), government departments, Non-government organizations, international development and humanitarian organizations, private organizations, and community-based organizations.   

Entry requirements

A minimum of diploma in a social sciences, education or health related field

Relevant training and experience in communication for health and development

Basic computing skills –Microsoft Office

Program structure and certification

This course will be administered in a period of two weeks in the Department of Public Health in the School of Medicine of the University of Zambia. Participants will be allowed an extra two weeks to complete their assignments, after which they will graduate. Only students who will pass will get a certificate. The course will be certified Department of Public Health of University of Zambia.

Course objectives:

At the end of this course, participants should be able to

• Discuss the health communication and education strategies and the methods

• Explore health communication and education targeted to interpersonal, community, and policy makers

• Develop skills in development of a strategic health communication plan

• Apply health communication and educational skills to disseminating of public health and medical science interventions

• Develop skills in preparing and analysing health communication and education literature and materials

• Understand the evaluation issues in health communication and education

Course content

Theoretical issues in health communication and education

The political and cultural contexts of health communication and education 

Developing a strategic health communication plan 

Developing and analysing IEC messages and materials

Intra and interpersonal health communication

Health provider-patient (and caregivers) communication 

Mass communication and community radio stations

Press releases and engaging the media

Media advocacy for health

Fork media and peer education approaches

Critical pedagogies and critical consciousness arousing

Adult learning approaches and community health literacy programs

Social marketing strategies and the role of social media 

Communicating high risk situations

Crisis prevention and management of rumours 

Communicating public health and medical research outcomes

Evaluation of health communication and educational processes and outcomes

Teaching and Learning methods

Lectures

Group discussions and presentations

Article reviews

Case studies

Assessment

Article reviews – 10%

Case studies discussion - 10%

Strategic health communication plan– 20%

Examination – 60%

Required readings

Bennett, P. (Ed.). (2010). Risk communication and public health. Oxford University Press.

Dutta-Bergman, M. J. (2005). Theory and practice in health communication campaigns: A critical interrogation. Health communication, 18(2), 103-122.

Lupton, D. (1994). Toward the development of critical health communication praxis. Health Communication, 6(1), 55-67.

Piotrow, P. T., Kincaid, D. L., Rimon, J. G., Rinehart, W., & Samson, K. (1997). Health communication: Lessons from family planning and reproductive health.

Robinson E.T. et al (2010) Communication handbook in clinical trials. Family health international

Schiavo, R. 2007. Health Communication: From Theory to Practice (electronic resource). Hoboken : John Wiley & Sons, Inc.